Mining Bees

A word to the wise - look out for little "volcanos" of loose soil appearing on your garden or lawn; They could be solitary bee nests!

Shared by Ed Phillips on Twitter

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Kate Christman
Ivy Bee

The latest solitary bees you’re likely to spot in the year, you can probably guess where you’re most likely to find the Ivy Bee!

Shared by Sophie Cooper on Twitter

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Kate Christman
Tormentil Mining Bee

The Tormentil Mining Bee (Andrena Tarsata) is so-called because of its dependency on Tormentil flowers. Found across much of Wales but is scarce and considered a priority species for conservation.

Shared by Buglife Wales on Twitter.

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Kate Christman
Red Mason Bee

These little bees are superb pollinators and are one of the first solitary bee species to emerge in the Spring, rapidly flitting between flowers.

Shared by Rachel Scopes on Twitter

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Kate Christman
Hairy footed flower bee

One of the first solitary bees to emerge in spring. People often confuse them for small bumblebees, although their quick darting flight motion is a good way to tell them apart. Found in urban greenspaces, parks, gardens and woodlands, nests tend to be shallow hollows in soft mortar, cob walls, soil and soft cliff faces.

Shared by Kate Bradbury on Twitter

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Kate Christman
Mining Bee

The Andrena (Mining) Haemorrhoa is a widespread, spring-flying species. Females have a bright, foxy-coloured covering of hairs on the thorax and a similarly-coloured tuft of hairs at the tip of the abdomen, which is otherwise almost completely hairless and shining black.

Shared by Ashley Cox on Twitter

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Kate Christman