Earn Your Stripes

Solitary Bee Week is week of action and education to raise awareness of our wonderful solitary bee population. But we can't do it alone! Earn your Stripes by pledging to help the solitary bees in one or more of the following ways and you can join our solitary bee hero gallery. Plus we'll send you an awesome digital badge to use on social media. 


  Plant a seasonal flower or plant   Nectar rich flowers and plants provide an important source of pollen for solitary bees, who are busy pollinating our crops and ensuring that plant communities are healthy. Earn your stripes by planting a seasonal pollinator friendly plant in your garden, hanging basket or outdoor plant pot, selected from the Royal Horticultural Society’s  Perfect for Pollinators: Garden Plants  list. 

Plant a seasonal flower or plant

Nectar rich flowers and plants provide an important source of pollen for solitary bees, who are busy pollinating our crops and ensuring that plant communities are healthy. Earn your stripes by planting a seasonal pollinator friendly plant in your garden, hanging basket or outdoor plant pot, selected from the Royal Horticultural Society’s Perfect for Pollinators: Garden Plants list. 

  Leave an exposed area of soil   Roughly 70% of solitary bees are called mining bees and nest in underground burrows up to 60cm deep. These burrows are often marked by small mounds of excavated soil. Do your bit for the bees by leaving an area of your lawn bare, or building a mound of sandy soil in a border or plant pot. 

Leave an exposed area of soil

Roughly 70% of solitary bees are called mining bees and nest in underground burrows up to 60cm deep. These burrows are often marked by small mounds of excavated soil. Do your bit for the bees by leaving an area of your lawn bare, or building a mound of sandy soil in a border or plant pot. 

  Buy or build a bee house   Cavity nesting bees, such as red mason bees and leafcutter bees, require dry hollow tubes to lay their young. You can either buy a bee house, such as Green&Blue’s award-winning  BeeBrick  or make your very own out of recycled materials. We recommend using this guide from the brilliant team at Buglife   here . 

Buy or build a bee house

Cavity nesting bees, such as red mason bees and leafcutter bees, require dry hollow tubes to lay their young. You can either buy a bee house, such as Green&Blue’s award-winning BeeBrick or make your very own out of recycled materials. We recommend using this guide from the brilliant team at Buglife  here

 
  Grow a wildflower patch   Although cultivated flower beds and baskets look lovely to humans, solitary bees much prefer long grass, wildflowers and nectar rich dandelions. Allow a metre square patch of your garden to grow wild, sprinkling it with seeds from the Royal Horticultural Society’s  Perfect for Pollinators: Wildflowers  list.

Grow a wildflower patch

Although cultivated flower beds and baskets look lovely to humans, solitary bees much prefer long grass, wildflowers and nectar rich dandelions. Allow a metre square patch of your garden to grow wild, sprinkling it with seeds from the Royal Horticultural Society’s Perfect for Pollinators: Wildflowers list.

  Spread the word   Give a short five-minute talk about solitary bees in your local community group or with some friends over coffee. Click on the pledge button to give your details and we will send you a free solitary bee tool kit, with a PowerPoint and easy talking points. 

Spread the word

Give a short five-minute talk about solitary bees in your local community group or with some friends over coffee. Click on the pledge button to give your details and we will send you a free solitary bee tool kit, with a PowerPoint and easy talking points. 

  Record a solitary bee   Get involved with a recording scheme, such as  BWARS  or  The Great British Bee Count , and record a solitary bee in your garden or local park. By taking part, you will be helping experts build their understanding of how solitary bees are coping with threats including habitat loss, pesticides and climate change. 

Record a solitary bee

Get involved with a recording scheme, such as BWARS or The Great British Bee Count, and record a solitary bee in your garden or local park. By taking part, you will be helping experts build their understanding of how solitary bees are coping with threats including habitat loss, pesticides and climate change.